Tracy Trettin

About Tracy Trettin

Director of Marketing

Tracy develops and executes Geonetric’s marketing communication strategy and manages the creation of collateral and sales tools. Tracy brings more than ten years of experience to Geonetric, including experience developing integrated marketing strategies and plans to enhance brand awareness, improve market positioning and increase sales. Most recently, Tracy served as director of marketing and communications for NSCA, a national trade organization. Prior to NSCA, Tracy held the position of marketing manager at Stamats, a national higher education marketing firm.

New Home for Geonetric

BuildingThe time has finally come. Geonetric has moved offices.

We left our home of 11 years, 4211 Glass Road. We left a building that kept our team members divided in separate suites on separate floors. We left the turkeys who occasionally followed us in the parking lot. We left an HVAC system and bathrooms that didn’t always work properly.

But we don’t have to worry about any of that anymore. We’re now at 415 12 Avenue. And what an amazing, inspiring place to call home!

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6 Hospital Blogs to Check Out Before Starting One at Your Healthcare Organization

Nearly half (47%) of hospitals have a blog. And blogs are among the top four digital tactics that hospital marketers plan to use more of in 2014. That’s according to the preliminary findings in our recent eHealth survey.

Combine those stats with these:

If you’re part of that 53% of healthcare organizations without a blog, perhaps it’s time to consider one.

To start, there are six questions you need to answer. (Thanks to Nick Westergaard, Brand Driven Digital, who highlighted these fundamentals at a recent content marketing bootcamp.)

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All Systems Go

For too many employees, needed vacations are put on hold due to overwhelming to-do lists. Not so at Geonetric. We not only encourage our employees to take vacations, we allow our employees to take a sabbatical – an extra week of paid leave – every two years. Why do we do this? Because our employees come back refreshed and full of new ideas.

We’ve also spent the last few years creating processes that are so efficient, they allow critical people to leave without disrupting the rest of the team. And our processes work. Just ask our product owner, David Sturtz. But you’ll have to wait till next week – he’s on sabbatical in Hawaii.

While David is away, the company is humming along, with the product development team hard at work planning for a major release next month. (We’re saving the big announcement for David to deliver himself in next month’s update.)

So the long story short is there is no product update this month, unless you count this picture David emailed along with a subject line that reads “Aloha!”

Don’t worry about anything back here on the mainland, David. All systems are go.

Congratulations to Geonetric’s Most Wired

What does it mean to be “most wired?” More than it used to. That’s according to H&HN Most Wired Survey. The survey has been going strong for more than a decade and provides a comprehensive snapshot of how information technology is being used in hospitals.

A lot has changed in healthcare IT over the last decade, and the H&HN survey has changed to accommodate the advances. For example, this year’s survey included questions on meaningful use and the scoring has become more transparent.

That makes the taste of victory even sweeter, and we’d like to congratulate Geonetric’s clients that made the list this year.

We know all of our clients are committed to using technology to connect with patients, potential patients and community, as well as using it to improve efficiency internally. We are excited to work with some of the most forward-thinking hospitals and health systems in the country!

Meeting vs. Movie: Which is More Entertaining?

Would you rather attend a movie or a meeting? It’s a question asked by a character in Patrick Lencioni’s book “Death by Meetings.”

Meetings are essential to leading and managing a successful business. It’s how we spend a majority of our time at work. Yet, many hate them. If we hate meetings, can we make good business decisions?

In the book, Lencioni tells the tale of an executive who struggles with his executive team meetings. Each week, they hold a two-hour meeting; only half the team attends, it starts late, and it’s filled with “mind-numbing” conversations. In fact, the group spends the majority of their time providing updates and little time working on the real challenges the company faces.

At different times in my career, I have participated in similar meetings and admit I have left feeling like I’ve wasted my time. After all, each week, I have approximately 40 hours to spend working and little time to waste.

Lencioni contends that the real problem with most meetings is that they are boring and ineffective:

Boring: “Meetings are tedious, unengaging and dry.” Lencioni compares meetings to movies. Many people would rather attend a movie than a company meeting. Why? Movies offer drama, conflict, and an opening scene that grabs your attention.  Leaders are often more concerned with avoiding tension or covering all topics within the set the timeframe than addressing conflict. To make meetings more interesting, leaders must uncover relevant conflict to keep people engaged, which Lencioni suggests will lead to more passionate discussions and better decisions.

Ineffective: “Meetings lack contextual structure.” People spend hours in a random meeting discussing everything from strategy to tactics just to find themselves at the end without a conclusion or clear direction.  To conduct more effective meetings, Lencioni recommends scheduling four types of meetings:

  • Daily Check-In – This is a quick, five-minute meeting. Offered daily, the meeting is conducted standing up and allows everyone to present their daily activities in 60 seconds or less.
  • Weekly Tactical – This weekly meeting should last between 45-90 minutes and focuses on a review of top priorities; critical metrics, such as revenue or customer satisfaction; and resolutions to any issues mentioned. The agenda for this meeting should be set after the top priorities are introduced.
  • Monthly Strategic: This meeting should last between two to four hours. During this time, executives should tackle a couple of critical issues.
  • Quarterly off-site: This one- to two-day meeting allows executives to review their long-term business strategy, teams, personnel and competitive and industry trends.

Since our management meeting was tasked with reading “Death by Meetings,” we have changed the way we think about meetings. Many of our meetings are structured as noted above, and based on Lencioni’s recommendations we are now consistently trying to mine for conflict. If you hold regular meetings, Lencioni’s book is a must-read for you. It offers great recommendations and is an entertaining read.

Work Hard, Play Hard

As the lead SQL developer at Geonetric, Jason Adams is well-known around the office… both for working on challenging database projects and for his passion for grilling. Often on summer days, you’ll find Jason at the grill – cooking something special for his hungry coworkers. Jason’s specialty: stuffed jalepenos.

If you want to know the tricks of his trade, all you have to do is visit FoodNetwork.com. Jason is competing for the title of “ultimate grillmaster.” Through a short video, he outlines each step he takes to whip up a batch of Hawaiian-style Stuffed Jalepenos (a recipe he created to combine two of his favorite foods – Hawaiian style pizza and jalepenos).

So, as you finalize your plans for this weekend, why not consider grilling? And, if you have a few minutes to spare, make sure and vote for Jason as the ultimate grillmaster. If he wins, perhaps he’ll finally garner enough support in the office to upgrade the Geonetric grill to the Charmglow Gourmet Luxury Island.